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Hi, I'm Iljitsch van Beijnum. These are all posts about IPv6.

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Will the IPv6 BGP table overtake the IPv4 table before the decade is out?

For my training courses, I always check the current size of the IPv4 and IPv6 BGP tables over at the CIDR Report so I can tell the participants what table size capacity to look for when shopping for routers.

Currently, the IPv4 table is at 925k, readying itself for scaling the 1M summit late next year. The IPv6 table is 160k prefixes.

The IPv4 table grew at about 10% per year in the 2010s and 6% last year. At this rate, it'll be at 1.43 million at the beginning of 2030.

The IPv6 table, on the other hand, had been growing at some 31% per year between 2015 and 2020, but last year it grew 37%. At that rate, the IPv6 table will reach 1.7 million prefixes by 2030! Even at a somewhat slower growth rate of 34% the IPv6 table will overtake the IPv4 table before the decade is out.

Of course it's hard to predict 7.5 years into the future, but stranger things have happened.

Also, at this rate, you'll need a router that can handle more than 2 million prefixes five years from now. Which pretty much means that if you are buying a router today that has to be able to hold the full global IPv4 and IPv6 tables, it should already be able to handle more than 2M prefixes in order to have a five year economic lifespan.

posted 2022-06-30

6-6-2012: World IPv6 Launch — the future is forever

Ten years ago, on 6 June 2012, the Internet Society organized World IPv6 Launch. A year earlier, we'd had World IPv6 Day, where many (large) organizations added IPv6 addresses for their websites to the DNS for 24 hours, in order to see if that would create problems. That went mostly smoothly, with a few surprises, so a year later it was time to turn on IPv6 for real. Time for a blog post looking back on worldipv6launch.org.

I thought this would be a good excuse to do what I've done with some regularity over the years: see how well things work when I turn off IPv4 on my home network.

Full article / permalink - posted 2022-06-07

OSPF: time to get rid of the totally not so stubby legacy

Recently, I was looking through some networking certification material. A very large part of it was about OSPF. That's fair, OSPF is probably the most widely used routing protocol in IP networks. But the poor students were submitted to a relentless sequence of increasingly baroquely named features: stub areas, not-so-stubby-areas, totally stubby areas, culminating in totally not-so-stubby areas.

Can we please get rid of some of that legacy? And if not from the standard documents or the router implementations, then at least from the certification requirements and training materials?

Full article / permalink - posted 2022-05-12

My first big Ars Technica story in 2007: "Everything you need to know about IPv6"

Fifteen years ago today, Everything you need to know about IPv6 was the first big story I wrote for Ars Technica.

Ah, those innocent days of the past when we still had more than a billion fresh IPv4 addresses to burn through... Back in those days, it was common to hear that IPv6 was unnecessary if we just used NAT.

Full article / permalink - posted 2022-03-08

Glasvezel: Fiber To My Home!

Overstappen op een heel nieuwe manier om aan het internet te koppelen gebeurt niet elke dag. Maar deze week wel: ik heb nu een glasvezel-verbinding. Het interessante aan FTTH (fiber to the home) is dat dit de eerste kabel is die het huis binnenkomt die daadwerkelijk bedoeld is voor internetverkeer.

Volledig artikel / permalink - geplaatst 2021-06-06

When the BGP table hits 1 million prefixes, will history repeat itself?

On the APNIC blog, Danny Pinto asks What will happen when the routing table hits 1024k? Back in 2014, the IPv4 BGP table reached 512k, a common limit in many routers at the time, and some bad things happened. See my post BGP table hitting 512k limit in older routers. And pretty much the same thing happened in 2008, when the BGP table hit 256k.

Full article / permalink - posted 2021-03-23

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