Image couldn't load - you don't seem to have IPv6 connectivity

iljitsch.com

blog topics: BGP · IPv6 · more · writing: Ars Technica · BGP (O'Reilly, 2002) · publications · contact: Twitter · LinkedIn · email · 🇺🇸 🇳🇱

Hi, I'm Iljitsch van Beijnum. These are all posts about IPv6.

Time to turn off IPv4 (just a little)

Another month, and we'll be living in the 2020s. And yet, 70% of the internet is still IPv4-only. (I'll be writing a story looking back on IPv6 progress the past decade in January.) So I thought: maybe I should draw a line in the sand and turn off IPv4 for my website. But then how will those 70% find me, and all the links to older content will be dead to much of the internet. Click below to continue reading.

Note: this is an example of the warning image, your IPv6 connectivity may be fine!

Full article / permalink - posted 2019-12-03 - 🇳🇱 Nederlandse versie

Tijd om IPv4 uit te zetten (een beetje)

Over een maand leven we in de jaren '20 van de 21e eeuw. En toch heeft 70% van het internet nog steeds alleen maar IPv4. (In januari schrijf ik een verhaal dat terugkijkt naar de voortgang van IPv6 in het afgelopen decennium.) Dus ik dacht: misschien moet ik een streep trekken en IPv4 uitschakelen voor mijn website. Maar dan kan 70% me niet meer vinden, en de links naar oudere artikelen zijn dan dood voor een groot deel van het internet. (Klik beneden om verder te lezen.)

Let op: dit is een voorbeeld van de waarschuwing, je IPv6-connectiviteit kan prima in orde zijn.

Volledig artikel / permalink - geplaatst 2019-12-03 - 🇺🇸 English version

Valid address space, bogons and martians

There are some advantages to filtering out packets with invalid addresses in them. That would be a packet with a private source or destination address, for instance. Those never have any business traveling across the internet. (Not to be confused with BCP 38 filtering.) For instance, there have been instances where spammers grab an unused prefix, start announcing it in BGP, do a spam run and then drop the prefix. When packets with private addresses enter your network, bad things may happen if you use those addresses yourself. And these invalid "martian" packets are just an annoyance, using up traffic and generating log entries.

Full article / permalink - posted 2019-11-28

Europe runs out of IPv4 addresses even further, what now?

Less than three months ago I wrote about how the uptake of the remaining IPv4 addresses at RIPE was accelerating, with the RIPE NCC likely to run out of the addresses set aside in the "last /8" before the end of the year. And so they did, two days ago. So as of this week, it's no longer possible to request address space in the RIPE service region (Europe, former Soviet Union, Middle East) and get them within a somewhat predictable period...

Full article / permalink - posted 2019-11-27

IPv4 to run out in Europe before the end of the year

Seven years ago, the RIPE NCC, which serves Europe, the middle east and the former Soviet Union, was no longer able to give out IPv4 address space to ISPs and other networks as needed. From that point on, the "last /8" policy came into effect, which meant that each "RIPE member" or local internet registry (LIR) could get one last IPv4 /22 (block of 1024 addresses). It very much looks like that last bit of IPv4 address space will run out before the end of the year.

Right before the final /8 policy came into effect, the RIPE NCC was giving out about a million IPv4 addresses per week. In 2019, they gave out a million IPv4 addresses every three months in the form of those final /22s. And now it's a million IPv4 addresses every six weeks, with two million left to go. Apparently, many new LIRs are set up to get one of those /22s while they last.

latest version of this image on the RIPE website

So in all likelihood RIPE will move from the final /8 policy to a new policy, where LIRs are put on a waiting list and get a /24 as those become available, before the end of 2019.

Permalink - posted 2019-09-09

Finally: native IPv6 at home!

It took a while, but I finally got native IPv6 at home from Ziggo, my cable ISP a few months ago. All it took was a new cable modem / home router, because they don't support IPv6 on the one I've had since I signed up with them six years ago. And lo and behold: I got myself some IPv6:

$ ifconfig en0
en0: flags=8863 mtu 1500
  ether xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 
  inet6 fe80::8d:5a:e4d:176f%en0 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x8 
  inet 192.168.78.24 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.78.255
  inet6 2001:1c00:d00:7300:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx prefixlen 64 autoconf secured 
  inet6 2001:1c00:d00:7300:75bf:1d31:ac76:d080 prefixlen 64 autoconf temporary 
  nd6 options=201
  media: autoselect
  status: active

Full article / permalink - posted 2018-11-11

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